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Hannah Rowan, Splitting, Calving, Melting, 2019

Risograph print on Olin natural white 170gsm paper, 42 x 29.7 cm (A3), Edition of 100 . Signed and numbered by the artist. Sold unframed

splitting, calving, melting

‘Splitting, Calving, Melting’ was created by placing ice directly onto the scanning bed of the risograph printer and making an image of its fluid transient state. The print relates to Rowan’s wider practice in which she creates interconnecting systems that speculate on the origins and many shifting states of water. The print instils some of the more ephemeral elements of her work into a tangible object and continues her exploration into the relationships between fluidity, ephemerality, geology and technology.

Kate Neave @ Her Prints

Hannah Rowan, Lithification, 2019

Risograph print on Olin natural white 170gsm paper, 42 x 29.7 cm (A3), Edition of 100. Signed and numbered by the artist. Sold unframed.

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The term ‘Lithification’ refers to the process of the creation of limestone through the accumulation of ancient sea-creatures compressed into layers and eroded by water- an active cyclical water cycle involving both water and stone. The image itself is based on a three-dimensional scan of a limestone rock and serves as a record of the original data. The print continues Rowan’s exploration into the relationships between fluidity, ephemerality, geology and technology.

Kate Neave @ Her Prints

Ghost Relics of the Atacama: NaCl Formations Available through Assembly Point 

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3D printed gypsum, 2018, each from an Edition of 5

The interplay between natural resources and the advanced technology that relies on their extraction to exist, is interrogated in another series of documenting works, ‘Ghost Relics of the Atacama’: digital scans of the salt rock formations that carpet the desert, recreated in 3D-printed gypsum. These examples of organic material translated into synthetic objects have the feel of pixels made flesh and look like bleached white phantom fossils, physical embodiments of our desire to digitise the environment around us as though subconsciously preparing for a future post-human archaeology.

George Bray 2018